The term "Performance Art" got its start in the s in the United States. It was originally used to describe any live artistic event that included poetsmusicians, filmmakers, etc. If you weren't around during the s, you missed a vast array of "Happenings," "Events" and Fluxus "concerts," to name just a few of the descriptive words that were used.

It's worth noting that, even though we're referencing the s here, there were earlier precedents for Performance Art. The live performances of the Dadaists, in particular, meshed poetry and the visual arts. The German Bauhausfounded inincluded a theater workshop to explore relationships between space, sound, and light. The Black Mountain College founded [in the United States] by Bauhaus instructors exiled by the Nazi Partycontinued incorporating theatrical studies with the visual arts - a good 20 years before the s Happenings happened.

Art History Basics

You may also have heard of "Beatniks" - stereotypically: cigarette-smoking, sunglasses and black-beret-wearing, poetry-spouting coffeehouse frequenters of the late s and early s. Though the term hadn't yet been coined, all of these were forerunners of Performance Art. ByPerformance Art was a global term, and its definition a bit more specific.

Performance Art also meant that it was art that could not be bought, sold or traded as a commodity. Actually, the latter sentence is of major importance. Performance artists saw and see the movement as a means of taking their art directly to a public forum, thus completely eliminating the need for galleries, agents, brokers, tax accountants and any other aspect of capitalism.

It's a sort of social commentary on the purity of art, you see.

Art History: The Basics

In addition to visual artists, poets, musicians, and filmmakers, Performance Art in the s now encompassed dance song and dance, yes, but don't forget it's not "theater". Sometimes all of the above will be included in a performance "piece" you just never know. Since Performance Art is live, no two performances are ever exactly the same.

art history basics

The s also saw the heyday of "Body Art" an offshoot of Performance Artwhich began in the s. In Body Art, the artist's own flesh or the flesh of others is the canvas. Body Art can range from covering volunteers with blue paint and then having them writhe on a canvas, to self-mutilation in front of an audience.

Body Art is often disturbing, as you may well imagine.From Vincent van Gogh's sunflowers to that framed piece of crap hanging in your dentist's office, humankind has produced a lot of famous and not-so-famous paintings. There is, therefore, little shame in viewing an unfamiliar work of art and saying, "I have no idea who painted that," rather than make an uneducated guess.

The penalty for the latter is severe: Stepping in front of a Gauguin classic and telling anyone within earshot, "Wow, Klimt really did know how to wield a brush, didn't he? Actually, I'm kidding about that last part. But misnaming an artist still won't do wonders for your intellectual reputation.

Putting This Theory Into Practice Reading up on history's artistic movements will familiarize you with the masterpieces. In the meantime, here are some common trouble spots when it comes to keeping your Manets and Masaccios straight:.

Leonardo da Vinci painted the Mona LisaMichelangelo set the standard for housepainters everywhere with the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel, Botticelli gave the world his Venusand the works of Raphael and Masaccio spawned legions of frustrated imitators. With so much iconic art created in a few decades' time, it can prove difficult to keep track of every work.

Even so, don't slip up and say that Botticelli gave the Mona Lisa her smile. Instead, spend some time familiarizing yourself with the greats from this era. Generations of art professors have tortured their students with "Was this painted by Manet or Monet? While the two artists shared some stylistic tendencies, they weren't exactly the Siamese twins of the Impressionist movement.

Art history

Monet was more of a landscape painter, intent on reducing fields and water lilies and haystacks to essences of color -- his The Water-Lily Pondfromis a prime example of this. Cubism: Early in the 20th century, a handful of artists found themselves bored by painting and sculpting reality. They began deconstructing traditional forms, transforming objects and people alike into visual blizzards of angles and panes and color.

Some of the world's most notable painters embraced this new avant-garde movement, from Georges Braque and Pablo Picasso to Marcel Duchamp and Jean Metzinger. But show someone a Cubist image, though, and they will likely revert to the standard answer for any innovative painting: "Um, Picasso?

The Cubists were more than Pablo. Unfortunately, it can prove difficult to distinguish Cubists based on their style. Picasso's Still Life with a Bottle of Rum is unnervingly similar in color and brushstroke to Braque's Candlestick and Playing Cards on a Tablefor instance.

Better to memorize individual works than risk confusing painters. Francis Bacon and Lucian Freud: Both painters, enormously influential on the British art scene following World War II, offered up portraits of humanity as a fleshy and vital thing.The text centers discussions around the object, its manufacture, and its visual character. It considers the contribution of the artist as an important part of the analysis.

This edition creates a narrative of how art has changed over time in the cultures that Europe has claimed as its patrimony and that Americans have claimed through their connection to Europe. The 9 th edition brings some exciting changes. Also, the text incorporates new learning objectives, graphics, and maps throughout.

MyArtsLab is an integral part of the Davies et al, program. Key learning applications include, Art 21 and Studio Technique videos, degree architectural panoramas and simulations and Closer Look tours. Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Books library land is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.

Your Header Sidebar area is currently empty. Hurry up and add some widgets. Join bookslibland Group. Buy Book From Amazon. Buy from amazon. Art History: The Basics Ebook. Add comment. Powered by Peter Anderson.Alliteration Hyperbole Metaphor Irony. View all reading worksheets. View all writing worksheets. Dramatic Irony Cacophony Anaphora Setting. View all literature worksheets.

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Art History Timeline

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Fully illustrated with an international range of artistic examples, Art History: The Basics also includes helpful subject summaries, further ideas for reading in each chapter, and a useful glossary for easy reference. Diana Newall completed her doctoral studies at the Courtauld Institute of Art. Account Options Sign in. Top charts. New arrivals. Art History: The Basics is a concise and accessible introduction for the general reader and the undergraduate approaching the history of art for the first time at college or university.

It will give you answers to questions like: What is art and art history?

What are the main methodologies used to understand art? How have ideas about form, sex and gender shaped representation? What connects art with psychoanalysis, semiotics and Marxism?

How are globalization and postmodernism changing art and art history? Reviews Review policy and info. Published on. Flowing text, Google-generated PDF. Best for. Web, Tablet, Phone, eReader. Content protection. Read aloud. Flag as inappropriate. It syncs automatically with your account and allows you to read online or offline wherever you are. Please follow the detailed Help center instructions to transfer the files to supported eReaders.Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.

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It will give you answers to questions like: What is art and art history? What are the main methodologies used to understand art? How have ideas about form, sex and gender shaped representation? What connects art with psychoanalysis, semiotics and Marxism? How are globalization and postmodernism changing art and art history?

Each chapter introduces key ideas, issues and debates in art history, including information on relevant websites and image archives.

art history basics

Fully illustrated with an international range of artistic examples, Art History: The Basics also includes helpful subject summaries, further ideas for reading in each chapter, and a useful glossary for easy reference.Put on your sensible shoes as we embark on an extremely abbreviated tour of art through the ages.

The purpose of this piece is to hit the highlights and provide you with the barest of basics on the different eras in art history. Paleolithic peoples were strictly hunter-gatherers, and life was tough. Humans made a gigantic leap in abstract thinking and began creating art during this time. Subject matter concentrated on two things: food and the necessity to create more humans.

The ice began retreating and life got a little easier. The Mesolithic period which lasted longer in northern Europe than it did in the Middle East saw painting move out of the caves and onto rocks. Painting also became more symbolic and abstract. Fast forward to the Neolithic agecomplete with agriculture and domesticated animals.

Now that food was more plentiful, people had time to invent useful tools like writing and measuring. The measuring part must have come in handy for the megalith builders.

It should be noted that "Stone Age" art continued to flourish around the world for a number of cultures, right up to the present. The "land between the rivers" saw an amazing number of cultures rise to—and fall from—power. The Sumerians gave us ziggurats, temples, and lots of sculptures of gods.

More importantly, they unified natural and formal elements in art. The Akkadians introduced the victory stele, whose carvings forever remind us of their prowess in battle. The Babylonians improved upon the stele, using it to record the first uniform code of law.

The Assyrians ran wild with architecture and sculpture, both in relief and in the round. Eventually, it was the Persians who put the whole area—and its art—on the map, as they conquered adjacent lands.

Art in ancient Egypt was art for the dead. The Egyptians built tombs, pyramids elaborate tombsand the Sphinx also a tomb and decorated them with colorful pictures of the gods they believed ruled in the afterlife. The Minoan culture, on Crete, and the Mycenaeans in Greece brought us frescos, open and airy architecture, and marble idols.

art history basics

The Greeks introduced humanistic education, which is reflected in their art. Ceramics, painting, architecture, and sculpture evolved into elaborate, highly crafted and decorated objects which glorified the greatest creation of all: humans. On the Italian peninsula, the Etruscans embraced the Bronze Age in a big way, producing sculptures notable for being stylized, ornamental, and full of implied motion.

They were also enthusiastic producers of tombs and sarcophagi, not unlike the Egyptians. As they rose to prominence, the Romans first attempted to wipe out Etruscan artfollowed by numerous attacks on Greek art. Borrowing freely from these two conquered cultures, the Romans created their own style, one which increasingly stood for power.


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